It’s an interesting time to be alive.

Ours is the generation that is curating a language that articulates otherness, and by that very act challenges the status quo and advocates for social justice. It is incredible to behold and to be part of this creation. I believe that in the way we remember Kwame Nkhrumah as the father of African nationalism, we will remember this generation for this language.

Privilege has been a big part of that engagement – looking to understand the connection between past and present, and that connection experienced by bodies that continuously negotiate space within communities. I have been thinking about it  differently though. The word privilege is used to capture how some of us are favoured by society; but what if it was used to also talk about the lived experiences of othered groups?  Women, LGBTQIA+, people of colour? It’s essentially appropriating the word to accommodate an inverse meaning (read: expanded) that articulates and engages on others’ lived experiences. After all, this language seeks to facilitate a shared understanding between people from diverse backgrounds. So a three-part series of articles, ‘The Privilege Series’ is what came off of that…

GAY PRIVILEGE IS…

FEMALE PRIVILEGE IS…

BLACK PRIVILEGE IS…